ACDelco SPECIALTY HEAVY DUTY SHOCKS

  • ACDelco Specialty Heavy Duty Shocks Primary Image

FEATURES & BENEFITS

  • Larger body allows for maximum fluid capacity and cool running for excellent performance
  • Bonded iron piston and compression head provides exceptional durability
  • Extra-large 1-5/8 inch piston bore and 9/16 inch piston rod diameter for excellent stability and strength
  • Heavy duty arc-welded end mounts for maximum strength and maximum resistance to damage
  • The super finished, chromed, piston rod provides anti-corrosion support, a more consistent wear surface, proper seal lubrication, and longer product life

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PRODUCT DETAILS


ACDelco Specialty Heavy Duty Shocks are specifically designed for commercial or severe application use on light trucks and vans, to help handle heavy loads. Designed to handle the heavy-duty demands of fleet applications, ACDelco Specialty Heavy Duty Shocks respond with stability and control. These shocks feature an oversized (1-5/8”) piston bore, bonded iron piston and compression heads, large piston and piston rod diameter, and heavy duty arc welded end mounts.

WARRANTY


12 Months/12,000-mile Limited Warranty*

* Whichever comes first. To the original retail purchaser. Parts only; installation not included. See your local retailer or independent service center that offers ACDelco parts for details.

FAQs


Is there a difference between a shock and a strut?

Yes, though shocks and struts perform a similar function, they vary greatly in their design. Struts are an integral part of a vehicle’s suspension system, providing structural support for the vehicle. Shocks work separately from any structural function, simply absorbing and damping the bumps from the road.

Do gas charged shocks or struts contain oil?

Yes, all shocks and struts use hydraulic fluid (oil) to control damping. A gas charged shock or strut uses high-pressure nitrogen gas to minimize oil foaming during high-speed damping, and therefore maintains performance.

Can I check my vehicle’s shocks for wear?

Yes, it is possible to do a quick check at home for wear on your vehicle’s shocks or struts. You can look for any physical damage to the shock or strut housing or any leaking – this is especially common on rear units that tend to have stones kicked up by the front wheels. You can also perform a bounce test by taking each corner of the vehicle and pushing down hard. The corner should drop, rise and settle again. If the body continues to move up and down, there’s a good chance your shocks need to be replaced.

Though these home tests can indicate worn shocks or struts, it is also recommended that you take your vehicle to a qualified service technician and let them do a thorough inspection. Refer to your owner’s manual for frequency.

Should I have my vehicle aligned after replacing my shocks or struts?

Yes, if you are replacing your vehicle’s struts. However, it is not necessary to get your vehicle aligned when replacing your vehicle’s shocks unless there was or is a previous issue.

Do I need different shocks for front, rear, left, or right applications?

Yes, it is important to choose the correct shock or strut for your vehicle model and year, as well as for the location in the vehicle.

MAINTENANCE TIPS


Your vehicle’s shocks and struts slowly deteriorate over time, though this wear is normally difficult to detect. To maximize your vehicle’s ride comfort, it is recommended to replace your vehicle’s shocks and struts every 50,000 miles. Worn shocks and struts can also cause additional wear to other vehicle components. Affected components include:

• Brakes
• Tie rods
• Ball joints
• Tires

To inspect your shocks and struts to gauge wear, check for:
Leaking oil or wetness along the body of the shock or strut.

• Broken mounts, worn or missing bushings.
• Broken, damaged, or missing mounting hardware.
• Severely dented reservoir tube, bent or scratched piston rod.
• Cupped tire wear.
• Damaged strut body springs, seats, and bushings.
• Defective strut bearing or missing plate.

Occasionally, twin-tube designs are misdiagnosed as defective due to the settling of oil during storage, which causes the shock or strut to seem soft or “dead”.

• Priming a shock will return all oil/gas content to its intended position & ensure proper operation of the unit. Based on application, not all struts will prime regularly.
• To prime a shock or a strut, compress and release the piston rod a few times until the full resistance of the shock returns.

 

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